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Intro


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Intro


President’s Message

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“Our vision and goal of healthy and resilient communities continues to challenge and motivate us each and every day.”

- Jan E. Hanohano Dill, President

Aloha e Na Hoa!  As my tenure with Partners in Development Foundation comes to a close, I reflect on what being its President has meant both for the communities we serve and for our own families. It has been such a privilege to be a colleague to the almost three hundred men and women who carry out the work of PIDF and to the many people who have supported our work! Over the years, I’ve had the blessing of watching amazing people doing amazing work for the children and families we serve in our Hawai‘i nei. From the first small teams who took preschool to families who couldn’t access or afford it, to those who reached out to the many foster families in our midst, over the years our staff have planted the seeds of transformational change in the lives of over 100,000 people through a wide variety of programs.

All of the above would not have been possible without the active and continuing support of our partners and friends. Financial support, encouragement, and guidance by the many, many people who have come alongside the work of the Foundation have allowed us to expand and deepen the scope, depth, and impact of PIDF programs. The insights and perspectives of the friends of PIDF allow us to maintain our focus and to strengthen our commitment to substantive and positive change for the children and families we serve.

Fiscal responsibility, measurable and defined outcomes, and an unwavering commitment to our cultural values and traditions have been at the heart of the work of the Foundation. PIDF does not seek to stabilize the status quo, but rather we pursue sustainable transformational change for those we serve. It is my hope that these elements remain the anchor points of our corporate culture.

This past year has opened new doors for the work of the Foundation. Sustainable natural farming is now an integral part of the work we do. The complete bilingual Hawaiian and English Bible was finally published, and work has begun to reinstate it as an important part of the life of our schools, churches, and families. Our early education efforts have gained expanded national and international interest and application. PIDF has committed to expanded partnerships with other organizations to develop cooperative resources and set goals for the most urgent social issues of our communities. All of this presents a great deal of challenges, but even more positive opportunities to build the “healthy and resilient” communities we strive for!

Thank you for your support and for your interest in the work of the Foundation. We extend to you our appreciation, and our best wishes for you and yours. Please enjoy both the printed and electronic windows to our work in 2018.

Me ke aloha piha,

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Jan E. Hanohano Dill                                                                             President, 1997-2019

President, Jan E. Hanohano Dill and Chairman of the Board, Kaulana H.R. Park

President, Jan E. Hanohano Dill and Chairman of the Board, Kaulana H.R. Park

 
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Chairman of the Board’s Message


CHAIRMAN’s MESSAGE

Chairman of the Board’s Message


CHAIRMAN’s MESSAGE

Aloha Kākou! We’ve had a remarkable year! I am sincerely humbled by the great generosity and outpouring of aloha that has been bestowed upon our foundation. This report serves as a confirmation of your steadfast belief in Partners in Development Foundation’s vision of bringing health and resiliency to our communities.

I want to express my sincere gratitude and aloha to Jan for his leadership and commitment towards transformational change in our communities. I am confident that our rich Hawaiian culture will not only continue but will be rejuvenated under new stewardship in years to come.

Mahalo to the many individual donors, partners, and organizations who have given generously to our programs, operations, and special projects. Your contributions allow us to provide much needed resources and ensure fiscal responsibility and transparency.

On behalf of our Board of Directors, mahalo for your continued support and for making a difference with a positive impact towards our communities in Hawai‘i!

Me ke aloha piha,

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Kaulana H. R. Park  Chairman of the Board 

Jan Dill ./
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Board of Directors


LEADERSHIP

Board of Directors


LEADERSHIP

Leadership

Board of Directors

Kaulana H.R. Park
Chairman of the Board

Reverend William H. Kaina
Vice Chairman

James V. Gomez, CPA
Treasurer

Diane S.L. Paloma, MBA, Ph.D.
Secretary

Kyle J.K. Chock
Director

Michael J Chun, PhD
Director

Jan E. Hanohano Dill
Director

Trish K. Morikawa, J.D.
Director

EMERITUS

Morris T. Takushi
Director Emeritus


In Loving Memory of
Gary A. Glenn 1937-2018 Director Emeritus

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Click here to read more about Gary Glenn’s legacy.

Officers

Jan E. Hanohano Dill
President

Laura R. Dang
Vice President of Administration/Secretary

Alison T. Masutani
Vice President of Operations

Stephanie K. Nishimura
Chief Financial Officer/Treasurer

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Mahalo e Jan Dill!


A DIRECTOR’s MESSAGE

Mahalo e Jan Dill!


A DIRECTOR’s MESSAGE

Mahalo e Jan Dill!

 

Aloha mai kākou,

For twenty years, President and CEO Jan E. Hanohano Dill has led Partners in Development Foundation with vision and foresight, creating and responding to opportunities to improve the lives of countless citizens of Hawai‘i, young and old, and to make a difference in our community. Few have had such a powerful and lasting impact on the social fabric of our island state. It is especially noteworthy because he has done so from off-stage and out of the spotlight. The PIDF ‘ohana and the community we serve are indebted to Jan, and extend heartfelt mahalo as he retires from the organization he created, served and loved as its only chief executive for the past twenty years. We do so with endless affection and enduring aloha.

Jan’s leadership has been key to the emergence of PIDF’s programs as transformational models for other organizations throughout Hawai‘i and the nation. Central to this acclaim is Jan’s unique skill in bringing the right people together at the right time to do the right thing in the right way! Using this special skill, Jan built PIDF into what it is today, a social services organization that is admired, respected and appreciated for the work we do, the people we serve, and the impact we make. Moreover, Jan’s strategic foresight in identifying community needs, and professional expertise in securing resources to address these needs, have been cornerstones of PIDF’s evolution. Indeed, equipped with a compelling vision and outstanding employees, PIDF is well positioned to continue serving the people of Hawai‘i with programs that are rooted in the culture of the first people of these islands.

On a personal note, my friendship with Jan spans six decades, starting as classmates in intermediate school. Intelligent and inquisitive, Jan established himself as a scholar and academic achiever. However, what set Jan apart from the mainstream was his character: ethical, steadfast, trustworthy, and principled. This has never changed. Then and now, integrity and moral courage serve as bookends to Jan’s life and his life’s work. This is why I and others trust his judgment so deeply and value his wisdom so greatly.

Servant leadership is Jan’s calling. Connecting heart to head, Jan brings compassion and diligence, understanding and justice, integrity and courage to all that he does and to all who he touches. A good and industrious man, Jan stands as a beloved leader and godly servant.

Mahalo nui loa, my friend, and warm and heartfelt Aloha.

Ke Akua pu,

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Dr. Michael J. Chun Board Member

Ka Baibala Hemolele


Ka Baibala Hemolele

the Hawaiian Holy Bible Project

Ka Baibala Hemolele


Ka Baibala Hemolele

the Hawaiian Holy Bible Project

Kevin Cockett, Kamehameha Schools Vice President of Communications and Chief Communications Officer, Kahu David Kaupu, Kahu Kimo Merseberg, and Bennett Hymer, Mutual Publishing

Kevin Cockett, Kamehameha Schools Vice President of Communications and Chief Communications Officer, Kahu David Kaupu, Kahu Kimo Merseberg, and Bennett Hymer, Mutual Publishing

Baibala Hemolele initially started as an effort to electronically preserve the 1839, 1868, and 1994 printings of the Hawaiian Bible and make it freely available to the public. It has since grown into a complete editing of the Hawaiian Bible to embrace the modern orthography.

The Baibala is a major linguistic, cultural and spiritual resource for the Hawaiian community and Hawaiian language students throughout the world.
— Helen Kaupu Kaowili, Baibala Hemolele’s Project Director

Our latest Baibala Hemolele release arrived just weeks after global language-learning platform Duolingo released the Hawaiian language on its mobile app. People are taking note that indigenous languages, such as Hawaiian, are important and in need of efforts to preserve, revive, and share with future generations.

Over the next few years we aim to improve our electronic hosting of the Baibala, make it more accessible to communities, and provide a Baibala curriculum that can be integrated in schools and churches. Mahalo palena ‘ole to the Atherton Family Foundation and Kamehameha Schools for their support and sponsorship. Without their partnership, this project would not be possible.

To purchase the full-bilingual Baibala Hemolele, visit PIDF.org or call our office at (808) 595-2752.


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Nā Pono No Nā ‘Ohana


Nā Pono No Nā ‘Ohana

Nā Pono No Nā ‘Ohana is a comprehensive family education program, where families come to school to learn together. The program is located at Blanche Pope Elementary School in Waimānalo.

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Nā Pono No Nā ‘Ohana

Nā Pono No Nā ‘Ohana is a comprehensive family education program, where families come to school to learn together. The program is located at Blanche Pope Elementary School in Waimānalo.

Since 2003, Nā Pono No Nā ʻOhana has served over 3,000 Native Hawaiian families. The comprehensive family education program is based at Blanche Pope Elementary School in Waimānalo. It is designed to prepare Native Hawaiian children for academic success in school, build parenting skills, provide guidance and assistance for adults to advance their own education, and help adults with work preparedness.

Nā Pono serves the entire family, using the four components of Family Literacy from the National Center for Families Learning: PACT (Parents And Children Together), Child Education, Parent Education, and Adult Education. Nā Pono also partners with local businesses and individuals to distribute food through community outreach to homeless participants.

People usually participate in the program initially for their children’s sake, but soon discover the benefits for themselves. Moses Kailihiwa started bringing his daughters to Nā Pono’s child education program before starting the Adult Education classes.

Moses is one of over 200 individuals to obtain their Competency-Based Community School Diploma - or “C-BASE” - through Nā Pono in the last five years. These people are our heroes as they persevere and do what they need to do, juggling work, home life, and children in order to achieve their goal of receiving that high school diploma. We are privileged to be able to help them change their lives and the lives of their families for the better.


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I had to get my diploma or lose my job. I’m a truck driver now, which is what I always really wanted to do. I worked my way up, I’m happy with where I’m at right now, thanks to [Project Director Lora Perry] and this program. It helped me out a lot.
— Moses Kailihiwa, participant

AT A GLANCE

  • Over 200 adults have obtained their diploma through Nā Pono since 2013

  • 384 KEIKI AND 237 CAREGIVERS/ADULTS SERVED (2017)

  • 245 ELEMENTARY STUDENTS TUTORED (2017)

  • 85% of people served in 2017 are Native Hawaiian

  • Over 3,400 people served since program inception


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We Are Oceania (WAO)


We Are Oceania (WAO)

We Are Oceania’s mission is to advocate for the overall health and well-being of Micronesian people and communities.

We Are Oceania (WAO)


We Are Oceania (WAO)

We Are Oceania’s mission is to advocate for the overall health and well-being of Micronesian people and communities.

The Micronesia region faces many challenges, such as U.S. militarization and weapons testing, loss of land from rising ocean levels, and lack of a sustainable local food supply. An estimated 15,000 to 17,000 people have left their homes in search of a better life for themselves and their families here in Hawai‘i.

Through an initial pilot grant awarded by the Department of the Interior’s Office of Insular Affairs, Partners in Development Foundation serves as the mentor organization for We Are Oceania. We Are Oceania (WAO) was created by a core group of Micronesian leaders and stakeholders in Hawai‘i whose aim is to advocate for the overall health and wellbeing of Micronesian people and communities.

We Are Oceania is a unique organization. Their one-stop shop at St. Elizabeth’s Episcopal Church in Kalihi is dedicated to the needs of the Micronesian community and offers a myriad of services. WAO’s services include translating documents, help finding employment, housing assistance, health insurance and welfare enrollment, and obtaining legal assistance where necessary.

The name “We Are Oceania” is rooted in the history of the indigenous people who navigated the vast North Pacific — today known as Micronesia. It honors the role of the ocean in binding these islands together rather than separating them, and providing abundant resources instead of depriving us of them.


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The Joseph Family

is one of many to be helped by WAO. They initially came to Hawai‘i a few years ago to seek medical care for their patriarch, Binasius (left). They struggled to overcome linguistic and cultural barriers before coming to We Are Oceania in 2015. Once there, staff like Case Manager Kathy Martin helped the family obtain housing and Mrs. Joseph to find a job, and helped their children apply for college.

If you need assistance to fill out an application, if you need insurance, job, or a college application, go to [We Are] Oceania, whatever you want to do, they’ll help you.
— Binasius Joseph
Visit to WAO’s one-stop shop from the Honorable U.S. Ambassador to FSM (Federated States of Micronesia), Robert Annan Riley III, the U.S. Ambassador to RMI (Republic of the Marshall Islands), Karen B. Stewart, and the U.S. Ambassador to ROP (Republic of Palau), Amy J. Hyatt.

Visit to WAO’s one-stop shop from the Honorable U.S. Ambassador to FSM (Federated States of Micronesia), Robert Annan Riley III, the U.S. Ambassador to RMI (Republic of the Marshall Islands), Karen B. Stewart, and the U.S. Ambassador to ROP (Republic of Palau), Amy J. Hyatt.

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Kupa ‘Aina Demonstration Natural Farming Project


Kupa ‘Aina Demonstration Natural Farming Project

Kupa ‘Aina is paving the way for developing sustainable food production models and providing cultural ‘āina-based experiential learning.

Kupa ‘Aina Demonstration Natural Farming Project


Kupa ‘Aina Demonstration Natural Farming Project

Kupa ‘Aina is paving the way for developing sustainable food production models and providing cultural ‘āina-based experiential learning.

At Partners in Development Foundation, we continue to address the contemporary issues we face as an island community through the lens of traditional Hawaiian values and wisdom. We are proud to say that this year, our commitment to healthy communities and healthy families has reached an important milestone with the creation and implementation of the Kupa ‘Aina Demonstration Natural Farming Project.

The name Kupa ‘Aina refers to native/indigenous foods, reflecting our goal to cultivate the land and foods utilizing ‘ike kūpuna to provide sustance today. While use of “‘āina” would refer to being native to the land, the change to ‘aina “helps keep us focused on what our kuleana is here,” says Kū'ikeokalani Kamakea-Ohelo, Kupa ‘Aina’s Project Director.

Kupa ‘Aina is paving the way for a food-secure Hawai‘i by developing sustainable food production models and providing cultural ‘āina-based experiential learning. These production models involve methods like microbial reclamation to increase crop yields, nutrient density, and do so all using materials found locally on the ‘āina.


Na wai ho‘i ka ‘ole ke akamai, he alahele i ma‘a i ka hele ‘ia e o‘u mau makua? [Who would not be wise on a path walked upon by my parents and ancestors?]
— ‘Iolani Liholiho, Kamehameha II

This project is a collective investment between Partners in Development Foundation, Kamehameha Schools, and the Kawailoa Youth and Family Wellness Center. This partnership shows the dedication of our partners in providing the framework for healthy and resilient communities through a collective commitment to training, educating, and making cultural experiences available firsthand.

Healthy and resilient communities would not be possible without healthy and abundant food, water, and shelter. As we seek sustainable solutions and what that means, we look to our Hawaiian ancestors and the wisdom they left us in mo‘olelo, ‘oli, and traditional practices.

Through our collective efforts, the Kupa ‘Aina project has the opportunity to sow seeds of transformational change rooted in traditional Hawaiian values and wisdom. That way, our keiki will reap the benefits of healthy communities and a food secure future. Mahalo for all the hands that have made the beginning of this project a success!

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Finance


Financial Highlights

Finance


Financial Highlights

Financial Highlights

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One of the more important financial ratios for nonprofit organizations is the ratio of program service expenses to total expenses, which provides an indication on how much of the organization’s resources are used for the benefit of those it serves. There is no minimum ratio; however, a program service ratio of 65% to 75% is typical for service organizations. For 2017, Partners in Development Foundation again achieved a program service percentage of approximately 93%. This means 93% of the Foundation’s efforts went to serving the community and only 7% went to overhead.
— Terri Fujii of CW & Associates, Inc., Independent Auditors
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2018 Highlights


2018 Highlights

2018 Highlights


2018 Highlights

Ulu Hana 2018

“Ulu Hana” acknowledges, identifies, and celebrates the work, expansion, depth, and degree of PIDF’s delivery of services. It also seeks, encourages, and promotes further growth in PIDF’s successful future. Mahalo to all our sponsors, partners, and other attendees for making our first Ulu Hana a great success! We hope to see you at the next event in April 2019!

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The ʻŌʻō Awards

President Jan E. Hanohano Dill was one of this year’s recipients of the Native Hawaiian Chamber of Commerce 42nd Annual ‘Ō‘ō Awards. Alongside fellow Native Hawaiians Heather Giugni and Marleen Akau, the three were recognized and celebrated for their accomplishments and service to Hawai‘i’s businesses and communities.

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Grants


Grants & Contracts

Grants


Grants & Contracts

Partnerships magnify the impact of the resources.
— Jan E. Dill, President

Aloha United Way 

Annie Sinclair Knudsen Memorial Fund of the Hawai‘i Community Foundation 

Asian & Pacific Islander American Health Forum 

City & County of Honolulu, Grant in Aid 

County of Hawai‘i - Department of Research & Development 

First Hawaiian Bank Foundation 

Friends of Hawai‘i Charities, Inc. 

Hawai‘i Community Foundation 

Hawai‘i Hotel Industry Foundation 

Henry A. Zuberano Early Education Fund of the Hawai‘i Community Foundation 

Kamehameha Schools 

Marisla Fund of the Hawai‘i Community Foundation 

Nā ‘Ōiwi Kāne Fund of the Hawai‘i Community Foundation 

Project Concern International 

Richard Smart Fund of the Hawai‘i Community Foundation 

Robert Emens Black Fund of the Hawai‘i Community Foundation 

Samuel N. and Mary Castle Foundation 

State of Hawai‘i Department of Education 

State of Hawai‘i Department of Health 

State of Hawai‘i Department of Human Services 

State of Hawai‘i Department of Human Services - Office of Youth Services 

Tai Up Yang Fund of the Hawai‘i Community Foundation 

Takie Okumura Family Fund of the Hawai‘i Community Foundation 

U.S. Department of Education - Native Hawaiian Education Program 

U.S. Department of Health & Human Services - Administration for Native Americans 

U.S. Department of the Interior - Office of Insular Affairs 

University of Hawai‘i School of Social Work 

W. K. Kellogg Foundation 

Waikīkī Community Center


Partners in Development Foundation is grateful for the many partners, foundations, and other organizations and individuals who have supported us for over 20 years!


Partners in Development Foundation staff at the annual Holomua gathering .

Partners in Development Foundation staff at the annual Holomua gathering.

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Donor


Mahalo to our donors & Supporters

Donor


Mahalo to our donors & Supporters

LEI WILIWILI $100,000+

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Aloha United Way

 

LEI PŪPŪ NIʻIHAU $50,000+

Hawai‘i Community Foundation

Tūtu and Me Families and Supporters

LEI LEHUA $25,000+

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American Savings Bank

 

LEI PAKALANA $5,000+

Baibala Hemolele Supporters

Bank of Hawaii 

Bank of Hawaii Foundation 

Bluewater Mission 

Community Health Education & Evaluation Partners 

Jan & Judy Dill 

First Hawaiian Bank Foundation

First Presbyterian Church 

Ka Paʻalana Families and Supporters

Kresge Foundation 

Locations Foundation 

Matson Navigation Company 

Aldah M. Medsker 

Pacific Resource Partnership 

Po‘e Hawai‘i Fund 

Robin Yoshimura 

We Are Oceania Supporters

Lei Pīkake $1,000+

Alexander & Baldwin, Inc. 

Armstrong Produce 

Aulani, a Disney Resort & Spa 

Kathy Ko Chin 

Michael J. and Bina Chun 

Laura Dang 

Stanley & Kathleen Fujihara-Chong 

Andrew Hashimoto 

Hawaii News Now 

Hawaii Operating Engineers Industry Stabilization Fund 

Hawaii State Teachers Association 

Hawaiian Electric Company, Inc. 

Hawaiian Electric Industries, Inc. 

Hui Hoʻomalu Supporters

James Campbell Company LLC 

Kalihi and Moanalua Church 

Kamehameha Schools 

Kaulana H.R. Park 

PSH Insurance, Inc. 

Rider Levett Bucknall Ltd 

Roberts Hawaii, Inc 

Kevin Saito 

Alan and Sharon Segawa 

Stanford Carr Development 

R. Bailey Stewart 

Takamine Construction, Inc. 

Morris T. Takushi 

Territorial Savings Bank 

The Queen’s Health System 

Todd & Seabolt, LLC 

Tower Development, Inc. 

Richard F. Wacker 

Karen Whitehead 

William Won & Margaret Lai

James Kometani 

Didi Leong 

Lihue United Church 

Aaron Mahi 

Marujyu Market 

Alison Masutani 

MW Group 

Nextera Energy Hawaii, LLC 

Stephanie Nishimura 

Steven & Jane Noah 

Craig Norris 

Office of Hawaiian Affairs 

Francis & Carol Pacello 

PAMCAH-UA Local 675 Cooperation Fund 

Glenn Pang 

Paradise Beverages, Inc. 

lei ʻilima $250+

AECOM 

Mary Akaka 

Joanne Arizumi 

Kalei Arnold 

James Belford 

Ann Bernson 

Joseph & Mary Borgo 

Ann Botticelli 

Kathleen D. Bow 

Angella Brandt 

Winfred Cameron 

The Catalyst Group, LLC 

Lin Ann Chang 

Harvey Chun 

City Mill Company, Ltd. 

Kaleio Clifft 

Geneson Coloma 

Keith Desaki 

Joanne Diggs 

Robert Eubanks 

Cathleen Glenn 

Goodfellow Brothers, Inc. 

Kimberly Greenly

Lauren Nahme 

Charles and Mildred Nakamura 

Nitchaphorn Okai 

Patricia K. Ota 

Palolo Ohana Learning Center 

Prince of Peace Lutheran Church 

Camri Ragudo 

Scott Ray 

Lois Resler 

Doreen Silva 

Allistair Sione 

David & Barbara Slone 

Hermann & Lotte Spitzer 

Truist 

Sharon Viveiros 

Jeff White 

Elizabeth L. Winternitz 

Gary Yanagihara of PSH Insurance, Inc. 

Landon Yoshida 

Peter Young 

Andrea Youngdahl 

Kelly Zane 

Hawaiian Kine Kards, LLC 

Scott Hew 

Gary Horita 

Vincy Inouye 

Island Insurance Foundation 

Allen Ito 

Megan Jeffries 

Peter & Rea Kang 

Eric Kapono 

Kawahara Nursery, Inc. 

Alan C. & Pat Kay

Ke Kama Pono Supporters

Liane Khim 

Maurine King 

Chris & Win Kitaoka 

Karsten Lee 

Eun Ho Lee 

David & Rhonda Matthews 

Mauna Lani Resort 

Harvey H. McInerny, Jr. 

James Kimo Merseberg 

The Michael B. Wood Foundation 

Mutual Publishing 

Patricia Nagamoto 


Mahalo to the many other individuals and organizations who have also supported Partners in Development Foundation during this period of July 1, 2017 through June 30, 2018, the Aloha United Way donors from the 2016 campaign year, and the American Savings Bank Kahiau Employee Giving Campaign donors.  Your generous cash and in-kind donations to support the work of the foundation are very much appreciated!


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